freshly brewed

Half dreamed ideas

206 notes

books0977:

Girl Reading (1918). Pekka Halonen (Finnish, 1865-1933)
For Halonen the views near Halosenniemi became an inexhaustible source of inspiration for his art. Many of his paintings depict simple scenes from his everyday surroundings. In Tuusula Halonen had a wide circle of artist friends and relatives which provided him with a daily source of social and cultural stimulation.

books0977:

Girl Reading (1918). Pekka Halonen (Finnish, 1865-1933)

For Halonen the views near Halosenniemi became an inexhaustible source of inspiration for his art. Many of his paintings depict simple scenes from his everyday surroundings. In Tuusula Halonen had a wide circle of artist friends and relatives which provided him with a daily source of social and cultural stimulation.

(via thomerama)

10 notes

naveen:

Buying art I was talking to @lately from The Art City Project, which aims to turn the city’s public spaces into canvases for artists. We found that among some of our friends, no one buys art for their walls anymore like they used to. Art is a great many things; different things for different people. Mostly, art is about showing what you like and investing in and supporting the artists you like. Perhaps a younger audience just doesn’t care about art on their walls because they live in a world of transience: simpler homes, moving apartments every few years, living in Airbnbs and leading a life that is about renting & sharing your goods more than it is about ownership. It could also be because it’s never been top of mind for a young audience: that perhaps as you get older, you tend to buy a home and set down roots and buy nicer furniture and nice art for your walls too. There’s more permanence in life than you’re afforded when you’re young.Younger people have just found another to show what they like: by wearing it. Art on shirts and art on shoes and hats. The most perfect example of this is Supreme. As in the art world, they’ve captured the idea of openings and limited runs and price points. And just as in the art world, there’s a collector’s market worth millions. What happens when you create a platform to turn your clothing into a canvas for artists? Open it up to more artists; open it up to more people. Make artwork (and thereby, its creators) accessible to more people. You get to show and wear the art you like. And you get to support the artists you like.

naveen:

Buying art

I was talking to @lately from The Art City Project, which aims to turn the city’s public spaces into canvases for artists.

We found that among some of our friends, no one buys art for their walls anymore like they used to. Art is a great many things; different things for different people. Mostly, art is about showing what you like and investing in and supporting the artists you like.

Perhaps a younger audience just doesn’t care about art on their walls because they live in a world of transience: simpler homes, moving apartments every few years, living in Airbnbs and leading a life that is about renting & sharing your goods more than it is about ownership. It could also be because it’s never been top of mind for a young audience: that perhaps as you get older, you tend to buy a home and set down roots and buy nicer furniture and nice art for your walls too. There’s more permanence in life than you’re afforded when you’re young.

Younger people have just found another to show what they like: by wearing it. Art on shirts and art on shoes and hats. The most perfect example of this is Supreme. As in the art world, they’ve captured the idea of openings and limited runs and price points. And just as in the art world, there’s a collector’s market worth millions.

What happens when you create a platform to turn your clothing into a canvas for artists? Open it up to more artists; open it up to more people. Make artwork (and thereby, its creators) accessible to more people.

You get to show and wear the art you like. And you get to support the artists you like.

25 notes

chels:

This pretty little moth landed on my window and flapped its wings at me this morning when I pulled into the Lab. I’m taking that as a sign of a good day to come.

chels:

This pretty little moth landed on my window and flapped its wings at me this morning when I pulled into the Lab. I’m taking that as a sign of a good day to come.

103 notes

classicpenguin:

 We were thrilled to see Penguin Random House author Richard Flanagan win the Man Booker Prize for Narrow Road to the Deep North, and even more so because his book draws attention to a great classic. As spring turned to summer in the year 1689, the Japanese writer Matsuo Basho embarked on a foot journey that has inspired poets and pilgrims for centuries. His account of a five-month walk through Edo Japan is at once a collection of haiku by the acknowledged master of the form and a wondrous travelogue that brings to life a countryside in new bloom. 
On choosing to borrow Basho’s title, Flanagan wrote, “Basho, the great Japanese haiku poet wrote a haibun—a sort of nature travel journal that combines haiku and prose— with this title. His Narrow Road to the Deep North is a high point of Japanese culture. The Death Railway is a low point of that same culture.” 
 

classicpenguin:

 We were thrilled to see Penguin Random House author Richard Flanagan win the Man Booker Prize for Narrow Road to the Deep North, and even more so because his book draws attention to a great classic. As spring turned to summer in the year 1689, the Japanese writer Matsuo Basho embarked on a foot journey that has inspired poets and pilgrims for centuries. His account of a five-month walk through Edo Japan is at once a collection of haiku by the acknowledged master of the form and a wondrous travelogue that brings to life a countryside in new bloom.

On choosing to borrow Basho’s title, Flanagan wrote, “Basho, the great Japanese haiku poet wrote a haibun—a sort of nature travel journal that combines haiku and prose— with this title. His Narrow Road to the Deep North is a high point of Japanese culture. The Death Railway is a low point of that same culture.”